One Hundred Years of Solitude: 1st Response

As strange as it may sound to have the execution of our main character in the first scene, this event reveals much about Colonel Aureliano Buendía’s impressive solitary character. Aureliano Buendía, an advocate for the Liberal party, is made prisoner by Conservatives, which is an external conflict between him and society. After his capture, he wishes for his sentence to be carried out in Macondo. However, once he is brought into town; instead of fearing his execution, it almost seems like he fears to see himself, the great Colonel Aureliano Buendía, associated with affection. To expand on this trait, he asks his mother to burn all his sentimental poetry, making her promise that no one will read them. This further reveals that Aureliano wants to leave behind only the legends of his pride and legacy, fearing that his personal image will ruin his dignity. The maturity upon death is a splendid development of his childhood solitude, as illustrated by his speech during Úrsula’s visit, “‘Don’t beg or bow down to anyone. Pretend that they shot me a long time ago'” (128). However, the author made sure that his stoicism is not to be confused with complete heartlessness like a flat character. He still experiences emotions, such as “an intestinal rage at the idea that this artificial death would not let him see the end of so many things that he had left unfinished” (130), which illustrates delicate characterization. Aureliano’s reluctance to demonstrate feelings significantly speaks to my life. Many close friends and family members assume that I don’t have positive relationships with them because I do not show signs of vulnerability, even though this is often untrue. As a result of his defense towards greater equality, Aureliano excels in “valuing diversity” of the BC curriculum. He takes extreme actions to support diversity and defend rights, viewing it as important.

 

One Comment:

  1. Deon,

    An excellent first response to your independent novel study!

    Stars:
    – Excellent integration of evidence / quotations within your writing. The evidence in this piece flows smoothly and helps to elaborate on the strengths and weaknesses of Buendía within the text.
    – Close reading of the text shows a detailed understanding of Buendía’s wants and fears — I am glad to see you are enjoying your read.

    Wishes:
    – How might you use some of the literary language discussed in class (internal / external conflict) in this piece?
    – If the introduction to your quotation is a full sentence (independent clause), use a colon to introduce your evidence.
    Example:
    The maturity upon death is a splendid development of his childhood solitude, as illustrated by his speech during Úrsula’s visit, “‘Don’t beg or bow down to anyone. Pretend that they shot me a long time ago’” (128).
    Changed to:
    The maturity upon death is a splendid development of his childhood solitude, as illustrated by his speech during Úrsula’s visit: “‘Don’t beg or bow down to anyone. Pretend that they shot me a long time ago’” (128).

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